NGĀ RINGA TOI | ARTISTS

Check out the profiles below for info about the artists collaborating with us on this event

Amber Bridgman
Kai Tahu | Kati Mamoe | Waitaha | Rabuvai | Moriori

Kahuwai is a conscious authentic Maori mahi toi fashion brand. Produced by Amber Bridgman Who has won various awards over the years, Her work has been shown nationally and internationally on the catwalk in museums and galleries. Recently Amber has been selected as part of the NZ delegation to travel to Hawaii for FestPAC 2020 Her work is a reflection on her tribal practises and her love for traditional Maori design and construction. she specialises in hand printing and traditional garments and accessories. There’s is no mass production in her work.

Amber Bridgman
Kai Tahu | Kati Mamoe | Waitaha | Rabuvai | Moriori
He Waka Kōtuia
Kai Tahu | Kāti Mamoe | Ngā hau e wha

He Waka Kōtuia is a whānau-based trust committed to upholding intergenerational well-being, using kaupapa kapa haka as a vehicle to grow rakatahi leadership in areas of taha Māori, tikanga Māori and te reo Māori. He Waka Kōtuia recently composed and recorded an album Te Mahi Tamariki with support from Mara TK and Troy Kingi which they will be performing as part of the festival opening.

He Waka Kōtuia
Kai Tahu | Kāti Mamoe | Ngā hau e wha
Te Aho Paihere
Kai Tahu | Ngā Hau E Wha

Creating supported whānau spaces where our mokopuna can learn and develop their connection to their identity.

Te Aho Paihere
Kai Tahu | Ngā Hau E Wha
Jennifer Duff
Kati Huirapa Ki Pukiteraki Ngai Tahu | Kati Mamoe | Waitaha | Te Ati Awa

Ko Hikaroroa ratau Ko Aoraki Ko Turakina ka mauka Ko Wakouaiti ratau Ko Waitakitako Ko Turakina Ka Awa Ko Pukiteraki Ko Etahi whenua ra papatu whenua Ko Kai Tahu, Kati Mamoe, Waitaha ratou Ko Te Ati Awa Ka lwi Ko Kati Huirapa raua Ko Kai te Rehi Ka Hapu Ko Uruao ratou Ko Arai te Uru, Ko Takitimu, Ko Aotea Ka Waka Ko Au tenei Ko Jennifer Pipiriki Tewhao Duff te ikoa. Artist Pounamu Carver, Silver Smith. Mixed media Traditional and contemporary Mahi toi. My Mahi Toi reflects my appreciation of my culture, my whanau and my surroundings as the inspiration for my art. I don’t ever lack for inspiration as a Mother it’s finding enough time execute my ideas I draw my strength from my Taha Maori, and I also have Irish and Scottish and English heritage. My belief is that upon this earth we are all one. We should protect, feed and nurture the land for only the land will feed our grandchildren. The connection made with People and stories made during the process of creating Taonga is what inspires and drives me, Māori identity and beliefs. relationship between the people and the land I Consider creating Art as my way of expressing myself spiritually and Culturally. I am passionate about Maoritanga and drawing upon my own whakapapa as an Indigenous methodology. I believe it is important to talk about and to practice traditional methods by our ancestors. I feel that traditional art forms, much like our language is something that could easily be lost if we don't frequently address and reminded each other our past and our Taonga I feel a lot of sadness towards it, and in term feel a great responsibility to create Taonga with a high standard of Authenticity and believe that Our Taonga and Art forms could easily be lost and forgotten if we don't maintain the protection, practice and knowledge of Traditional methods meanings. As a Kaiwhakaaro Pounamu I hold a lot of dismay when it comes to the marketing of Pounamu and importation of Canadian Jade which is in many cases is openly represented and sold as Nz Pounamu, As a carver It upsets me to know that our traditional designs and images are used abroad and our Hand crafted Taonga are mass produced in factories using hi tech machinery, and cheap labour. Not only is it a misrepresentation of our Culture It is severely jeopardising the success and income of Carvers and artists alike as it is just not worth competing with the market of mass-produced products. The production of Artworks of high quality is the only option to combat the plagiarism of our culture. Although I believe it is important to uphold Traditional Mahi Toi Maori art forms Contemporary Maori Art too has its place, I enjoy developing Toi Maori contemporary design and materials based on traditional forms and producing works in permanent materials that reflect the style of traditional forms.

Jennifer Duff
Kati Huirapa Ki Pukiteraki Ngai Tahu | Kati Mamoe | Waitaha | Te Ati Awa
Corey Bragg
Kāti Mamoe | Kāi Tahu | Ngāti Kahungunu

Corey Bragg (Kāti Mamoe, Kāi Tahu, Ngāti Kahungunu) is a researcher and member of the Rakiura Tītī Islands Administering Body. As a recent graduate of the Māori Visual Arts programme (Te Wānanga o Aotearoa), Corey will provide a visual presentation that explores sustainability, science, and mahi kai relating to the Tītī

Corey Bragg
Kāti Mamoe | Kāi Tahu | Ngāti Kahungunu
Kirsten Parkinson
Ngāi Tahu | Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki | Ngāi Tūāhuriri

The Illustrator for Reo Pēpi bilingual books is Kirsten Parkinson. Parkinson graduated from the Dunedin School of Art in 2000, returning a few years later as the Ngāi Tahu artist in residence. Parkinson currently teaches Dance at Otago Girls' High School and continues to create gorgeous pukapuka with her cousin, Kitty Brown, author of Reo Pēpi.

Kirsten Parkinson
Ngāi Tahu | Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki | Ngāi Tūāhuriri
Jonathan Waters
Ngāti Airani | Ngāti Ingarani (Ngāti Pākehā)

Ko Jonathan Waters tōku ingoa. I tipu au ki Hakatere ki Waitahi, engari e noho ana au ki Ōtepoti mō ngā tau e rima. I nukunuku au ki Ōtepoti mō te mahi kaiako tuatahi nō te Whare Takiura ki Pōneke. I muri i tērā wā, I ako au ki 'Ara' ki Ōtautahi mō te tohu paetahi whakatauira whakanikoniko. I mutu taku ako au i te tau 2013. I whakaako toi au ki Te Kura Tuarua o Kingi mō ngā tau e whā. Anō, i tērā wā ka ako i Te Reo Māori ki TWOA, Ōtepoti. Nā reira, he kaiako, he kaipeita me te kaitāparepare i tēnei wā. I roto i te ao mahi toi - E ono ngā whakamātakitaki toi takitahi nō 2013 ki Pōneke, Ōtepoti me Ōtautahi. He maha ngā whakamātakitaki toi rōpū e whakahaere au i tēnei hapori anō. I tēnei haerenga ka pirangi au i te auaha ngā toi whakaaro-nui me te toi nō aku wheako whaiaro.

Jonathan Waters
Ngāti Airani | Ngāti Ingarani (Ngāti Pākehā)
Chris Flavell
Ngāti Kahu | Tainui

Art-land is what i call the place i go to when my mind wants more than the mundane. Stepping into this place i am free from manipulation by things less important. I am king of this place and make my own rules as regards to the direction, pace and visual my senses pursue. I guess that's why i love it here...its just me alone with colour and thoughts that come from the heart or mind. The good and bad in my past create the present work which helps me except the bad and be grateful for the good. The struggle to succeed outside art-land within the physical world is motivation to continue, but the freedom I've had to create and wake every morning to answer only to myself and wonder which direction my art form will take me today is enough payoff for my choice to create....and move outside the mundane.

Chris Flavell
Ngāti Kahu | Tainui
Lah Di Dah
Ngāti Porou | Ngāti Hāmoa

"How do we define ourselves, when we are not to be accepted at all?... Our definition is not of our individual selves but that of society’s perception. Either rise or crumble, but do not beg or cower. Show them how your success is of power and greatness, but do not seek approval. Show yourself how... You. Did. That.” - LDD

Lah Di Dah
Ngāti Porou | Ngāti Hāmoa
Rauangi Level 4 Tauira
Te Wānanga O Aotearoa

Kowhaiwahi panels produced by tauira of the Rauangi Level 4 Arts course, under the tutelage of Heramaahina Eketone (Weaver, Carver, Painter, Taamoko Artist)

Rauangi Level 4 Tauira
Te Wānanga O Aotearoa
Heramaahina Eketone
Waikato | Ngāti Maniapoto

Heramaahina Eketone is a multimedia and interdisciplinary ringatoi interested in all forms of Toi Māori including mahi raranga, whakairo, rauangi, tāniko and tā moko. Heramaahina is particularly interested in Māori design and teaches the Kāwai Raupapa certificate in Māori and Indigenous arts at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. Heramaahina has produced well-known works promoting Māori and Pasifika identity, and collaborated in several Art_Science projects for local tertiary education and cultural institutions

Heramaahina Eketone
Waikato | Ngāti Maniapoto
Simon Kaan
Waitaha | Kāti Mamoe | Kāi Tahu

Simon Kaan (Kāti Irakehu, Kāti Mako) creates timeless meditations upon the meeting points of place, whakapapa and sustenance through print, paint and performance. Kaan is the Dunedin School of Art’s Māori student advisor.

Simon Kaan
Waitaha | Kāti Mamoe | Kāi Tahu
Vicki Lenihan
Waitaha | Kāti Mamoe | Ngāi Tahu

Vicki Lenihan (Ngāi Tūāhuriri, Kāti Huirapa) is a sculptor, writer, event producer and museum professional whose practice centres around our sense of place and celebrating our unique and irreplaceable environs, interrogating colonial frameworks and received knowledge systems. Working traditional motifs into manufactured materials to represent the extensive and spectacular habitats entrusted to our care by the atua, Lenihan challenges expected modes of operation and materiality, namely the tropes of collectivity in women’s work and the permanence of ‘masculine’ fabrics and post-industrial design. Lenihan actively participates in social praxis through group projects and installations, and ongoing community arts advisory, advocating for local stories told by local artists.

Vicki Lenihan
Waitaha | Kāti Mamoe | Ngāi Tahu
Te Whānau Arohanui
Waitati

Waitati-based whare wānaka, celebrating and facilitating hauora and whanaukataka through education and practical workshops, including mahi toi and kaupapa mahika kai.

Te Whānau Arohanui
Waitati
Rewa Pene
Whakatohea

Rewa is a architectural and commercial photographer based in Ōtepoti, Aotearoa (Dunedin, New Zealand). Rewa works predominantly with in the community supporting culture, preforming arts, and local events.

Rewa Pene
Whakatohea
Metiria Turei
Āti Haunui a Pāpārangi | Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa | Rangitane

I live in Dunedin and am an artist studying at the Dunedin School of Art, Te Kura Matatini o Otago. I have spent two decades in law and politics and have a background in performance art and costuming. My art practice concerns the use and design of taniko as a metaphor for Māori agency and self determination in the present and the future. My work is primarily in performative textiles, activated on the body and presented in film and photographs. My current work Turuapo Astronesian 3000 uses textiles to tell a new history of Mahuika, Atua of Fire and Kurangaituku, Atua of the Forest who meet their Astronesian uri on a distant planet in a new century. The work links Afrofuturism with Maori whakapapa and mana wahine and asks What if the Universe was first navigated by Polynesians, what if Maori occupied Space?"

Metiria Turei
Āti Haunui a Pāpārangi | Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa | Rangitane